Introduction

Announcing an integration of linear scripts A, B, and C on Konosos.net.

There is considerable overlap among the three linear scripts.  Rather than create three dedicated websites, I will combine all three scripts on one website, which will eliminate redundancy and complex cross references.  During the process, which I expect to have completed by May 2015, some pages may act as placeholders, may have already been moved to Konosos, or may be inaccessible, if the links have not been updated.   Please be patient while I streamline your research experience.

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While there has been much debate about the underlying language of Linear A (LinA, 線文字A, Γραμμικη Α), I disagree that LinA does not resemble a known language. Despite its similarities to Japanese, historical linguists dismiss a correlation for at least two reasons: (1) the apparent lack of genetic evidence and (2) the universally held belief that LinA is an Indo-European language. Regarding the first justification, if linguists are looking to mainland Japan for genetic evidence, they are looking too far north. By whatever means, it appears that, around 1000 BCE, the Minoans entered Japan from the southern islands, and gradually moved north. Regarding the second justification, Minoan scholarship generally agrees that the Minoans migrated from the Anatolian region**, which suggests an Altaic origin or influence. Likewise, Japanese scholarship suggests that the Japanese language belongs to the Japonic-language family, which is believed to have an Altaic origin or influence.

General consensus dates the demise of the high Minoan civilization as late as 3,500 years ago, with the widespread destruction of the palace centers, while Neil Gordon Munro dates the commencement of the Yamato culture, which is the presumed progenitor of modern Japanese civilization, as early as 3,000 years ago. According to Munro, the origin of the Yamato culture is unknown but had arrived in a highly advanced state. The culture is notable for its grave goods–bronze arrowheads, bells, and halberds. The culture is also notable for its wheel-thrown pottery, which employed “restrained” decoration with “subdued color” [1908:4].

The Okinawan (Uchina’a) Japanese remain culturally, genetically, and linguistically distinct from the mainland (Yamato) Japanese, although the two cultures are believed to share a common proto language. This forum will provide support–through disciplines such as archaeology, architecture, art, genetics, and language–for my dual theories that LinA is proto Japanese and that the Minoan civilization provides a rich backdrop for Japanese history, which, for millennia, has been shrouded in mystery.

Reference:

  1. Munro, Neil Gordon. 1908. Prehistoric Japan.

** See Naru Kanashi: Paradise Across the Ocean

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AN OPEN INVITATION TO SCHOLARS:

There are numerous leads that invite unprecedented scholarship into the Minoan/Japanese affinity.  The aim of this forum is to encourage and to coordinate this scholarship.  If you have a scholarship interest, please contact me so that I can post a notice for other like-minded individuals.  If you have a general interest, I can offer leads that speak to your scholarship interests.  This forum is formatted to publish scholarly articles that permit peer review via CrossRef.  However, you do not need academic affiliation to publish on this forum;  I invite all interested individuals.  Nevertheless, I do require that all authors use professional names rather than internet user-names to post articles and comments.

Log ins are not required to post comments. However, since your words may be quoted in scholarly articles, this forum requires that professional names be used to post comments. Please click "Edit/Change" to include credentials after your name. For example, you may say "Mary A. Smith: Harvard University, Associate Professor of Geography" or "John Jones: Independent Scholar, Historical Linguistics" or "Independent Scholar, General." Moreover, to promote scholarly excellence, this forum reserves the right to edit for clarity. Clear writing complements clear thinking.

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